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Source: Facebook/ Caroline Pule

TYI chats to the phenomenal Caroline Pule, about her thoughts on youth leadership and aspirations, as well as a recent conference she has attended.

Pule is a doctoral student in the department of molecular biology and human genetics at Stellenbosch University and an Ambassador for South African National Tuberculosis (SANTA).

1. What was the conference about?

The conference was about leadership development for women in Health and Sciences fields.

2. Where did it take place?

It was held at the Indaba Hotel (13-14th June 2017), Fourways, Johannesburg.

3. How can aspiring young women who are in the same field get involved?

They can be involved through attendance, as the conference happens annually.

4. Any words of encouragement for aspiring young women who want to enter into the Health & Science fields but face stereotypes and a glass ceiling?

Firstly, very important!

Its self-esteem and believing you’ve got what it takes to reach your goals. That everything is possible through hard work, determination and the grace of God.

Moreover, life is about choices. It doesn’t matter what family you come from, whether rich or poor; that doesn’t limit you as a young woman to pursue your career dreams.

To be that Doctor, Engineer, Scientist or Mathematician you want to be. All you need to do is stay focused, be willing to excel in all you do and use every opportunity that comes your way to succeed.

5. Tell us more about yourself?

I’m a Doctoral student in the department of molecular biology and human genetics, Stellenbosch University and an Ambassador South African National Tuberculosis (SANTA).

My PhD project focuses on Tuberculosis (TB research). I’m aware of the challenges faced by public health with the TB epidemic in South Africa and my research may lead to the development of novel drug targets to combat the spread of drug resistant TB.

6. What are some of the challenges you face and how do you deal with them?

My challenge is patience. Accepting that not all experiments are successful at the first try, or second or third attempt.

Nevertheless, due to the fact that I love my work as a medical scientist, I have learnt to accept that this is the nature of “science”.